When it comes to cooling, the attention of most PC enthusiasts is drawn towards high performance air or liquid CPU coolers that can handle overclocked high-end processors without breaking a sweat. But countless desktops are shipped with modest cooling systems that have to do the job without suffering the all-too-common pitfalls of being noisy or expensive. One such common cooler has been Arctic's Freezer 7 Pro, which has been around for almost forever, and which is getting a successor this week. Dubbed the Arctic Freezer 7 X, the updated cooler promises 10% better cooling performance, a slightly lower cost, low noise levels, and even compatibility with future CPUs.

The Arctic Freezer 7 X is a tower cooler made of aluminum and featuring two 6-mm U-shaped direct touch heat pipes as well as 44 0.4-mm fins. The cooling system comes equipped with a 92-mm fluid dynamic bearing PWM-controlled fan that produces noise levels of up to 0.3 Sone (22.5 ~ 24.5 dBA). The fan has a special cover that enhances the look and optimizes the airflow to maximize performance. The Freezer 7 X is 132.5 mm high and is 110.5 mm wide, so it will not fit into most Mini-ITX chassis, but it should be compatible with the majority of standard ATX towers.

Arctic’s new Freezer 7X is compatible with all mainstream CPU sockets, including AMD’s AM4/AM3 and FM1/FM2 as well as Intel’s LGA 115x and upcoming LGA 1200. To simplify usage, the cooler comes with pre-applied MX-2 thermal paste.

The Arctic Freezer 7 X is covered by a six-year warranty, it carries an MSRP of $19.99 and is available from retailers like Amazon. In the near future Arctic also plans to introduce its Freezer 7 X CO with a double ball bearing fan.

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Source: Arctic

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  • Dragonstongue - Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - link

    IMO Arctic would be MUCH better off if they had the fault fan using that stupid AS HELL shroud able to be clipped or unclipped from it.

    As this is a major problem (likely adds to the cost for them, therefore the buyers) vs using a "simple" clip mechanism, where a little "tongue" of this plastic they use is able to click into place somewhere along the left or right edge of the cooler and/or standard MM size of fan the cooler can accept.

    I was fairly partial to Coolermaster use of the original clip style used on the Hyper 212 Plus much less fighting with it vs metal tension wire style, however, the metal wire is DIRT CHEAP for the company to offer and works much much better than another style..that is those odd rubber push in silencers.

    Price wise, $20, becomes easy $35-40 or so in Canada (along with other places) will be a very hard sell when example Deepcool Gammaxx 400 is likely superior all the way around...also does not use silly shrouds and supports a variety of sizes (though default is 120mm fan)

    I suppose at least for myself, seeing as I use AMD (previous AM3/3+) and currently AM4, far too many of them (makers of coolers) seem to believe we only want cooler orientation to be north-south instead of offering the option to go north-south or east-west to get the best possible cooling, many of Arctic as well as example Thermaltake was like this concerning AMD sockets, but not a problem using Intel based sockets instead.

    this seems like it is meant to "clamp" to the default socket retention ring, therefore is likely to be one of those only offers a single orientation (unless this does have a crossbar mechanism, doubtful given price point) compatible, sure, high compatibility, not so much if this is the case.

    also not TDP stated either? (quick read up on Comet Lake says 25w though this can maybe spike to ~60w -150w loaded?

    ^.^
    Reply
  • patssle - Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - link

    Been using the Freezer 7 on various processors from 3770 to my current 9700. Been pretty happy with it over the years. Reply
  • Rockmandash12 - Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - link

    intel and changing sockets, name a more iconic duo Reply
  • Weltoris - Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - link

    Looks like a copy of an old Zalman low end heatsink, the cnps5X.
    It looks extremely similar
    Reply
  • Weltoris - Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - link

    Although the Zalman should perform better as it has 6 heatpipes Vs 2 on this Reply

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