Known for their rather unorthodox devices, IO Data recently introduced a new external Blu-ray drive that works with USB Type-C hosts. An otherwise typical slimline Blu-ray drive, the BRP-UT6/MC2 not only supports the latest BDXL and M-DISC specifications, but also comes with Apple Mac-compatible software.

Featuring a z-height of 11 mm and weighing 220 grams, the IO Data BRP-UT6/MC2 can playback and burn all modern types of optical discs, including CDs, DVDs, BD-Rs (including LTH media at up to 6X speed for burning), BDXLs (up to four layers, 128 GB, up to 4X burn speed), and M-DISCs (up to three layers, 100 GB). The drive is not listed as being compatible with Ultra HD Blu-ray movies, so it likely lacks the necessary AACS 2.0 firmware.

However USB-C purists take note: it looks like IO Data has cheated here a bit. The external Blu-ray drive itself actually sports a USB 3.0 micro-B interface, rather than being end-to-end USB-C. Because of this, IO Data includes two cables: a USB 3.0 micro-B to USB Type-C cable to be used with modern laptops, and a USB 3.0 micro-B to USB Type-A cable so that it can work with the broad array of existing computers that only feature USB Type-A ports. Based on what we know about the USB Type-C specificaiton – specifically, that USB-C devices aren't allowed to connect to USB-A hosts – it makes sense why IO Data would want to go this route, as they'd otherwise be locking themselves out of a significant portion of the existing market.

Hardware aside, IO Data ships its BRP-UT6/MC2 drive with a code to download Roxio’s Toast 17 Titanum software, which can be used to copy and burn CDs/DVDs/BDs, edit video, capture video, and perform other similar tasks. That program cannot playback Blu-rays, so to do so one will need to acquire a different product.

The BRP-UT6/MC2 ODD will be released later this month at a price of ¥19,800 ($183) including VAT.

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Source: IO Data (via Hermitage Akihabara)

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  • TheUnhandledException - Thursday, January 3, 2019 - link

    Yes. In fact every modern cellphone in the world uses it. Reply
  • edzieba - Friday, January 4, 2019 - link

    Yes. It explicitly defines the adapter, handshaking, the power available, etc. Reply
  • HStewart - Thursday, January 3, 2019 - link

    Big question? Does this drive required external power to work - I notice with without external power on HUB that drives will not works - but these are standard old fashion USB A drive with convertor or now power hub.

    Also does this drive support Gen 2 speed - ideally a drive like this should support both USB-c and Thunderbolt 3 support ( not just working on TB 3 - that is normal for any USB-C device )

    It would of course also nice to support ULTA HD movies
    Reply
  • Gadgety - Thursday, January 3, 2019 - link

    "The drive is not listed as being compatible with Ultra HD Blu-ray movies, so it likely lacks the necessary AACS 2.0 firmware." What a shame. Otherwise it'd be really attractive buy, tiny, and powered straight from the PC. Reply
  • Valantar - Saturday, January 5, 2019 - link

    Why on earth would this need Thunderbolt? Not only would that make it incompatible with non-thunderbolt USB-C devices, but it would make _zero_ sense functionally as there is no way whatsoever playback from or burning to optical media exceeds the bandwidth of USB 3, let alone USB 3.1G2. Also, it'd add (at least) $100 to the price, necessitate a larger chassis (to fit the larger PCB due to the larger controller), increase heat output, and ... well, make no sense at all. Reply
  • TheUnhandledException - Thursday, January 3, 2019 - link

    "The external Blu-ray drive itself actually sports a USB 3.0 micro-B". Fail USB 3 micro-usb is DOA. Using it in a new product in 2018 is pure fail. Reply
  • rpg1966 - Thursday, January 3, 2019 - link

    On the other hand, who cares what the connector type at the device end is? Reply
  • Valantar - Saturday, January 5, 2019 - link

    People who might want to buy a replacement cable at some point, or just care about durability. The USB 3.0 micro-B connector is a nightmare in so many ways. Reply
  • LordConrad - Friday, January 4, 2019 - link

    As long as it has the necessary speed and functionality, I wouldn't care if it used an old Centronics connector. As long as it meets your needs, who seriously cares how it connects? Reply
  • LordConrad - Friday, January 4, 2019 - link

    These guys are a bit late to the party. I bought a Pioneer BDR-XU03 a while ago, same specs from what I can tell and it works perfectly with my PC and Macbook Pro. Reply

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