AnandTech Storage Bench - The Destroyer

The Destroyer is an extremely long test replicating the access patterns of heavy desktop usage. A detailed breakdown can be found in this review. Like real-world usage and unlike our Iometer tests, the drives do get the occasional break that allows for some background garbage collection and flushing caches, but those idle times are limited to 25ms so that it doesn't take all week to run the test.

We quantify performance on this test by reporting the drive's average data throughput, a few data points about its latency, and the total energy used by the drive over the course of the test.

AnandTech Storage Bench - The Destroyer (Data Rate)

The BX100's performance on The Destroyer isn't dead last, but it underperforms for its capacity.

AnandTech Storage Bench - The Destroyer (Latency)

Average service time is startlingly high and is close to a hard drive's seek time.

AnandTech Storage Bench - The Destroyer (Latency)

AnandTech Storage Bench - The Destroyer (Latency)

The frequency of performance outliers is in line with the other two low performers on this test, indicating that the BX200's performance doesn't stutter any more often, but it pauses for longer periods of time when it does stutter.

AnandTech Storage Bench - The Destroyer (Power)

Higher power consumption is to be expected from a drive using TLC NAND, but the BX200 consumed more than twice the energy over the duration of The Destroyer than any of the other drives, and more than five times as much as the BX100. The BX200 didn't take vastly more time to complete The Destroyer, so it was clearly not making good use of idle time.

Performance Consistency AnandTech Storage Bench - Heavy
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  • jabber - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    Yeah I use V300's exclusively in SATA II based PCs and laptops as they will push 270MBps+ all day long. No point buying 850 EVOs there. Must have bought 50+ and all of them are still going strong. Reply
  • extide - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    You guys made a typo on page 8, under "Mixed Sequential Read/Write Performance" -- you duplicated "duplicating" heh Reply
  • Billy Tallis - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    Ironic. Thanks. Reply
  • NeonFlak - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    1tb Mushkin Reactor for less than $300 any day over this. Reply
  • MikhailT - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    Is it me or is Crucial messing up lately with regressed successors? MX100 was great but MX200 was not that great and BX100/BX200 is even worse. It would've been better for them to just keep MX100 and drop prices over time.

    Crucial is basically just convincing me to switch to Samsung next time.
    Reply
  • leexgx - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    BX100 was very good for laptops, very low power use even when under load
    BX200 is slower and use crap load more power , the TLC drives are just not worth the £10 cheaper price
    Reply
  • LarsBars - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    I've heard AnandTech say in the past, "It doesn't matter which brand of SSD you go with- just that you go with SSD."

    It looks like the BX200 means we need to be more vigilant about which SSDs we buy.
    Reply
  • JimmiG - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    It wouldn't be terrible if it was a bit cheaper. If the price drops over the next couple of months (which usually happens with SSD's), it would be great as a "secondary SSD", especially the 960GB model. However at the current prices, you're better off paying a tiny bit more for much better performance and endurance. Reply
  • Hulk - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    I don't understand. Same endurance as the BX100 series using the same process size yet this is TLC vs. MLC for the BX100?

    While the performance is not great I could see this for media storage if the price is right. And by right I mean $200/TB.
    Reply
  • Billy Tallis - Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - link

    The endurance ratings for warranty purposes are only loosely connected to the actual P/E cycle count, and are usually pretty conservative. Plus, the BX200 does have the benefit of more sophisticated error correction. Reply

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