While this year’s official Mobile World Congress event may have been canceled, a number of vendors are still going ahead with their previously scheduled product announcements and launches. Among them is Intel, who decided to use the time to announce a major expansion/realignment of their second-generation Xeon Scalable processors. With 18 new CPUs ranging from $306 to $3950, Intel is undertaking a significant shift in their Xeon Gold, Silver, and Bronze lineups, claiming to lift performance, but also rather obviously cutting prices.

Coming into 2020, Intel’s server saga continues to be an odd one, even by the sometimes wild fluctuations of the tech industry. In terms of sales, Intel has seen tremendous success with their data center product portfolio, growing revenue by 19% in a capacity constrained environment. Intel still can’t make enough 14nm chips – server processors included – to fully meet market demands, which is a very profitable problem to have.

However, Intel’s technology situation doesn’t reflect their sales situation: rival AMD’s second-generation EPYC processors have Intel beat in almost every metric, offering better performance and greater energy efficiency, all at lower prices. AMD has been able to offer more cores than Intel both on an absolute basis and per-dollar, giving AMD the stronger hand. The silver lining for Intel, at least, is that they are able to thrive on sheer momentum, as enterprise IT decisions are made on the scale of years. But there’s no escaping the fact that AMD’s EPYC processors are going to continue to chip away at Intel’s Xeon market share. Intel has to respond to AMD.

To that end, today Intel is launching 18 new “performance- and performance-per-dollar-optimized” Xeon Scalable processors. Based on the same Cascade Lake silicon as Intel's existing parts, the updated CPUs cover the Gold, Silver, and Bronze tiers (there are no new Platinum chips). The updated SKUs are set to deliver sizable performance bumps, effectively replacing some of the already available Xeon Scalable SKUs.

Depending on the specific SKU, Intel is offering more cores, higher clockspeeds, or more cache than earlier chips – and often, all three at once. Ultimately, depending on if you view the glass as half-full or half-empty, Intel is either boosting Xeon Scalable performance by upwards of 33%, or cutting prices by even more (50-60%+ in some cases). But either way, it’s a big change for the Xeon family.

Officially, Intel is focused on comparing the new SKUs to the first-generation Skylake-SP based Xeon Scalables, where they are touting an average performance gain of 36% for a total increase in perf-per-dollar of 42%. This is a little bit of a misnomer, as these new SKUs aren’t a new generation in and of itself, and Intel has already publicised the 1st Gen to 2nd Gen benefits at the 2nd gen launch.

As far as Intel is concerned, these are all still part of the second-generation family. And while we’ve seen the name “Cascade Lake Refresh” unofficially thrown about, Intel didn't use this name in our briefings, at least as far as their official press releases and other communiques are concerned, however most of the new parts have the letter 'R' to designate them from the rest.

For their refreshed chips, most of these chips are getting the R suffix, indicating it’s a faster refresh chip. Intel is also introducing a single socket U series chip, and a single high temperature T series chip.

Intel is also introducing a pair of non-suffixed high frequency chips: the Gold 6250 and Gold 6256. With 8 and 12 cores respectively, both of these chips are rated to turbo up to 4.5 GHz, which is 100MHz higher than Intel’s best existing Xeon, and 400 MHz higher than anything else being introduced today. These parts are being specifically flogged at customers who need maximum performance in single/lightly-threaded workloads, and represent one of the few remaining technological edges that Intel has over AMD’s EPYC chips. We might have heard rumors that some of the big hyperscalers love these chips, as they fit their needs combining performance and TCO.

Intel Second Generation Xeon Scalable Family
(Cascade Lake)
New SKUs in Bold
  Cores Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
L3
Cache
TDP
(W)
Optane Price
Xeon Gold 6200
6262 V 24 1.9 3.6 33.00 135 Yes $2900
6258 R 28 2.7 4.0 38.50 205 Yes $3950
6256   12 3.6 4.5 35.75 205 Yes $3900
6254   18 3.1 4.0 24.75 200 Yes $3803
6252   24 2.1 3.7 35.75 150 Yes $3665
6252 N 24 2.3 3.6 35.75 150 Yes $3984
6250   8 3.9 4.5 35.75 185 Yes $3400
6448 R 24 3.0 4.0 35.75 205 Yes $2700
6248   20 2.5 3.9 27.50 150 Yes $3072
6246 R 16 3.4 4.1 35.75 205 Yes $3286
6244   8 3.6 4.4 24.75 150 Yes $2925
6242 R 20 3.1 4.1 35.75 205 Yes $2529
6242   16 2.8 3.9 22.00 150 Yes $2529
6240 R 24 2.4 4.0 38.50 165 Yes $2445
6240   18 2.6 3.9 24.75 150 Yes $2445
6240 Y 18 2.6 3.9 24.75 150 Yes $2726
6238 R 28 2.2 4.0 38.50 165 Yes $2612
6238   22 2.1 3.7 30.25 140 Yes $2612
6238 T 22 1.9 3.7 30.25 125 Yes $2742
6234   8 3.3 4.0 24.75 130 Yes $2214
6230 R 26 2.1 4.0 35.75 150 Yes $1894
6230   20 2.1 3.9 27.50 125 Yes $1894
6230 N 20 2.3 3.5 27.50 125 Yes $2046
6230 T 20 2.1 3.9 27.50 125 Yes $1988
6226 R 16 2.9 3.9 22.00 150 Yes $1300
6226   12 2.8 3.7 19.25 125 Yes $1776
6222 V 20 1.8 3.6 27.50 115 Yes $1600
6208 U 16 2.9 3.9 22.00 150 Yes $989
Xeon Gold 5200
5222   4 3.8 3.9 16.50 105 Yes $1221
5220 R 24 2.2 4.0 35.75 150 Yes $1555
5220   18 2.2 3.9 24.75 125 Yes $1555
5220 T 18 2.2 3.9 24.75 105 Yes $1727
5220 S 18 2.7 3.9 24.75 125 Yes $2000
5218 R 20 2.1 4.0 27.50 125 Yes $1273
5218   16 2.3 3.9 22.00 125 Yes $1273
5218 N 16 2.3 3.9 22.00 105 Yes $1375
5217   8 3.0 3.7 16.50 115 Yes $1522
5215   10 2.5 3.4 16.50 85 Yes $1221
Xeon Silver 4200
4216   16 2.1 3.2 16.50 100 - $1002
4215 R 8 3.2 4.0 11.00 130 Yes $749
4215   8 2.5 3.5 16.50 85 Yes $794
4214 R 12 2.4 3.5 16.50 100 Yes $694
4214   12 2.2 3.2 16.50 85 - $694
4214 Y 12 2.2 3.2 16.50 85 - $768
4210 R 10 2.4 3.2 13.75 100 Yes $501
4210   10 2.2 3.2 13.75 85 - $501
4210 T 10 2.3 3.2 13.75 95 - $554
4209 T 8 2.2 3.2 11.00 70 - $501
4208   8 2.1 3.2 11.00 85 - $417
Xeon Bronze 3200
3206 R 8 1.9 - 11.00 85 - $306
3204   6 1.9 - 8.25 85 - $213

Officially, Intel hasn’t cut prices on anything. The new chips come in at the same price as their direct predecessor; for example the new Gold 6242R has a list price of $2,529, the same price as the existing Gold 6242. However as I mentioned before, with Intel increasing core counts and clockspeeds across the board, if you look at things from a fixed performance perspective, then the new SKUs are a de-facto price cut. Otherwise, for the same price you’re now getting more cores, more cycles, and more cache for the price.

In fact, the cache may be the most interesting but least visible part of this change. Whereas many of the existing Xeon Gold parts only ship with 25 to 30 MB of L3 cache – consistent with their core counts – a significant number of the new parts ship with well over 30 MB of cache. So along with the raw core counts and clockspeed changes, the larger cache will be helping Intel to boost its overall performance and competitive positioning.

Otherwise, left out in all of this is Intel’s Xeon Platinum line of chips, which remain unchanged. The Platinum chips remain the only way to get a Xeon that’s capable of running in an 8 socket configuration, but the new Xeon Gold SKUs put a lot of pressure on those chips. With Intel offering up to 28 cores and 38.5 MB of L3 cache on a Xeon Gold now, the Platinum chips don’t have the same advantage they once did. So the net result is that unless you need the extra sockets, chips like the Gold 6258R are offering everything that the Platinum 8280 offers at 39% of the price. Unofficial price cuts indeed!

Alternatively, if we compare the Xeon Gold 6252 to the Xeon Gold 6230R, these two chips have the same core count and base frequency, but the 6230R is about half the price. The 28-core Xeon Platinum 8276, compared to the 28-core 6238R, has the same base frequency and cache size, but the price is $8719 to $2612, which is a 70% price differential. That's a lot cheaper if you do not specifically need 8-socket support offered by the Platinum.

Platinum 8276 vs Gold 6238R
Platinum
8276
AnandTech Gold
6238R
$8719 Price $2612
28C / 56T Cores/Threads 28C / 56T
2.2 GHz Base Frequency 2.2 GHz
4.0 GHz Turbo Frequency 4.0 GHz
38.5 MB L3 Cache 38.5 MB
165 W TDP 165 W
8 MP Sockets 2

Also interesting is that Intel has cut MP socket support on the new CPUs. These new CPUs only support dual socket operation, making the Xeon Gold series a complicated mess of 4-socket box, 4-socket all-to-all, 2-socket 2-UPI and 2-socket 3-UPI MP configurations. There have been some suggestions that Intel wants to regress back to the E5 (2-socket) and E7 (4 and 8-socket) product segmentation but in the new naming scheme, but this just makes it all the more complicated for no obvious reason.

Wrapping things up, the new chips are set to be available today. Intel’s press release specifically focuses on OEMs/ODMs, so it’s not clear when any of these chips will show up on the open market. But if the manufacturers already have them, then for those chips that are available far and wide (i.e. not going to a handful of vendors like Facebook), then we should expect to see them soon,

Source: Intel

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  • rahvin - Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - link

    You aren't the only one confused by their system. Now ask yourself this, based on that number and "color" (ie gold, bronze, etc). Can you deduce what features that CPU has?

    Intel painted themselves into a corner with this huge stratified pricing scheme.
    Reply
  • Deicidium369 - Thursday, April 16, 2020 - link

    Nope not at all. Dumb people have problems figuring out the world in general. Reply
  • M O B - Monday, February 24, 2020 - link

    @Ryan Smith (or if anyone has a link to a good source), are you able to get a straight answer from Intel regarding their chip shortage? Curious when Cascade Lake-X is actually going to be purchasable.

    Cutting prices is all well and good, but you still need to be able to buy the chip.
    Reply
  • Kevin G - Monday, February 24, 2020 - link

    While pricing adjustments for Cascade Lake are nice, where is Cooper Lake? While Cooper Lake is an AI focused part with BF16 support, I thought it was to launch a new platform and serve as a stop-gap prior to Ice Lake's arrival in the server space. I guess Intel is wanting to focus Cooper Lake square at that segment and only start the platform transition for mainstream servers with just Ice Lake-SP? Reply
  • duploxxx - Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - link

    all delayed till end of this year at least Reply
  • Deicidium369 - Thursday, April 16, 2020 - link

    Will start shipping shortly - both will be a high volume part - so they have to fill the OEM orders first and once the channel is fed, OEMs will start releasing. SuperMicro already has part numbers (not published on website) for the new sockets and both Ice Lake and Cooper Lake.

    So 3rd quarter first systems should start shipping.
    Reply
  • Machinus - Monday, February 24, 2020 - link

    Intel is trying to dump their obsolete refuse as fast as possible. Remember when the 9900KS was worse than other chips the day it was released? Intel is about two or three product lines behind. Reply
  • Deicidium369 - Thursday, April 16, 2020 - link

    Final iteration of an outgoing generation... not uncommon .. like when a redesigned Camry is coming in next model year, and the outgoing model is sold at discount at the end of the year... Reply
  • ianisiam - Monday, February 24, 2020 - link

    I'm surprised they didn't call it Xeon SP 2nd Gen +. Reply
  • bigvlada - Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - link

    Xeon Gold 5222, 4 cores, $1221!!!? Please tell me it's a typo. Reply

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